Expressions of Research

Expressions of Research was a collaboration between Fringe Arts Bath, the University of Bath’s Public Engagement Unit and Edge Arts with support of the University’s 50th Anniversary Fund.

Five artists met five University of Bath research centres in this fascinating exhibition, where a study of each other’s methods led to five original collaborations.

Showcasing works across drawing, sculpture, installation and performance, the pieces included adapting mathematics to create sculpture, poetic verse influencing mass-emergency response, mechanical machines for making music, performance representing the elasticity of poverty and visual statements on the creation of sustainable molecules.

FIONA HAINES, MATRIX 1, 2 AND

 3 This work involved the transformation of three discarded University ventilation grids, whose context is 

changed by the application of coloured paint. These grids act as a metaphor for the development of new materials within the CSCT team.

Researchers at the Centre for Sustainable Chemical Technologies (CSCT):  Professor Matthew Davidson, Dr Janet Scott, Dr Antoine Buchard, Marcus Johns

ANDREW HENON, SWIM LANES 

In this piece, artist Andre
w Henon makes a visual response to a research paper entitled, “Managing the surge in demand for blood following mass casualty events: Early automatic restocking may preserve red cell supply.”  He considers what happens when we translate real world information into mathematical formulae, how we find time to reflect when there is an urgency to find results or solve problems, and other questions in a mixed media piece of video, performance, poetry and painting.

Researchers at the Centre for Healthcare Innovation and Improvement (Chi2):  Professor Christos Vasilakis, Dr Gozdem Dural-Selcuk, Dr Neo Stylianou, Marianna Frangeskou

AMELIA BEAVIS-HARRISON, JOB CENTRE JUNIOR 

Working on a variety of areas that focus on looking at poverty, the work consists of performance, installation and newspaper. It looks at child poverty and the impact poverty has on children, particularly within the Bath and North East 

Somerset area.

Researchers at the Centre for Analysis of Social Policy (CASP): Adrian Burgess, Beth Jaynes, Professor Tess Ridge OBE

JENNY RIDGWAY, THE BLUES MACHINE AND PITCH PIPE PUMP Jenny’s two kinetic sculptures are operated by a participatory audience. The Blues Machine comprises of an automated glockenspiel, which plays a pre-progammed twelve bar blues backing track and further notes can be added by the audience member. Pitch Pipe Pump is a hand cranked pneumatic pump that pushes air through two sets of pitch pipes. Both sculptures were inspired by the University of Bath’s Powertrain and Vehicle Research centre, whose awe-inspiring labs, Jenny tells us, contain all manner of fabulous contraptions.

Researcher at Powertrain Vehicle Research: Professor Chris Brace

JEAN BAYNHAM, DATA STACK Jean’s practice is grounded in mathematics and patterns, and her research has brought her to the conclusion that mathematics andart have much in common. Her sculpture, projection and drawings bring together a recurring theme from her collaboration with the Institute for Mathematical Inno

vation: pattern. “We are all seekers of pattern,” she comments. “When it is observed, we want to understand why it has occurred.”

Researchers inthe Department of Mathematical Sciences andthe Bath Institute for Mathematical Innovation (IMI): David Calderbank, Jonathan Dawes, Paul Milewski, Kit Yates.