Two dancers, a man and a woman, two sides of the same coin, are caught in a struggle to find their place in the world.

In an interactive environment, a little robot called ‘Macheba’ both interacts and observes the dancers, mirroring and absorbing our human identities.

British-Brazilian choreographer Jean Abreu has now spent half his life in Brazil and the other half in Britain. This new dance work is the second production in a trilogy where he explores human identity, formed in-between different cultures and dance languages.

With the use of robotics in Solo for Two, Jean Abreu continues to explore the challenges of technology in his work, following BLOOD (2013) in collaboration with the renowned British visual artists Gilbert & George. In contrast to the first solo on the inside of the body, Solo for Two focuses on the outward journey: how a migratory identity is created by cycles of loss, letting go and new beginnings.

Jean Abreu choreographer & dancer British-Brazilian Choreographer and Dancer Jean Abreu received the Jerwood Choreography Award in 2003 following the creation of his first choreography Hibrido. Since then, his work has toured throughout the UK, Europe and Brazil including performances for Dance Umbrella, Edinburgh Festival Fringe, Royal Opera House and Southbank Centre in London.

This new work is created in close collaboration with the international dance dramaturge Guy Cools, Portuguese dance artist Margarida Macieira, Italian creative technologists Michele Panegrossi and Luca Biada, and computer scientist Dr. Leon Watts, Senior Lecturer at the University of Bath.

Solo for Two is co-commissioned by Southbank Centre and Horniman Museum, and has received the support of Arts Council England, University of Bath, Bath Spa University, Swindon Dance and South East Dance.

18+ ONLY

TICKETS £10, £8 CONCS, £6 EAC STUDENTS

Workshop & Show Ticket Deal £20
Jean Abreu in association with Bath Dance is providing a Behind-The-Mind Workshop for advanced dancers on Sat 19 May. Find out more.
Simply add both tickets to your basket to qualify for this offer.

Image credit: Ambra Vernucci

Abreu's fluid, rippling movement is enjoyable to watch and the opening sequence, the dancers working on individual pathways but coming together, is visually striking - the undulations of their arms and upper bodies took on a mesmeric quality'

Rachel Elderkin on A Thread (2015), Londondance.com

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